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  • Permalink for 'A Report From The Las Vegas Piece Junket'

    A Report From The Las Vegas Piece Junket

    Posted: 10-March-2014, 1:47pm EDT

    Last summer I wondered about finding and visiting Walter de Maria's Las Vegas Piece, three miles of trench bulldozed into the Nevada desert in 1969. [Technically, I wrote about the Center For Land Use Interpretation's account of leading curator Miwon Kwon's graduate seminar on a hunt for Las Vegas Piece, and about how the artist prepped people for visiting the piece, and about just recreating the damn thing already, we have the technology! Did you know Sturtevant worked on plans to make a double of Double Negative? On the ravine on the Mormon Mesa right next to Michael Heizer's fresh original? Holy smokes, people, read Bruce Hainley's book. But that's another post.]

    Yes, the piece is supposedly lost, and now de Maria is, too. And so all we're left with is his description of Las Vegas Piece from his 1972 oral history interview with Paul Cumming.

    But no, there is another. The late curator Jan van der Marck wrote about visiting Las Vegas Piece in the catalogue for an exhibition of "instruction Drawings" from the Gilbert and Lila Silverman collection at the Bergen (NO) Kunstverein in 2001. van der Marck was a founding curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and was involved in organizing artists' response to the police violence at the 1968 Democratic Convention. But that's another post, too. Here's van der Marck's crazy story of what amounts to an Earth Art junket: [with paragraph breaks added for the internet]:

    Earth art turned into a personal experience for me in February 1970 when Virginia Dwan invited me and a few German art writers and museum directors to join her and the artists Michael Heizer and alter De Maria on a quick inspection of some new works in the Nevada Desert. From the Las Vegas airport our small band traveled ninety-five miles in north-northeastern direction on unpaved roads, in the back of Heizer's pickup truck.

    That afternoon was going to be devoted to De Maria's Las Vegas Piece, which he would describe to us only as "an extensive linear work on a flat valley floor." An hour before sundown we arrived at our destination and were gripped by the stillness of the landscape. Before us stretched a freshly dug, eight-foot deep ditch in the sage brush-covered desert soil, in the distance loomed the purplish mesas.

    We had to lower ourselves into the bulldozed trench, which wind and erosion already had given a natural look, and we were to start walking. Other trenches would branch of, the artist warned us, and choices had to be made, but it would not take us long before the layout could be deduced from the turns with which we were faced. The first man or woman able to draw a mental map was encouraged to shout and would be declared the winner. And, by the way, De Maria added, 'don't go the full three miles, because if you do, you are not much of a mathematician!" The configuration we were to discover for ourselves in the least amount of steps was a one-mile incision into the landscape meeting another one-mile incision at a right angles [sic]. At the midpoint of each one-mile stretch a set of half-mile ditches branched off, meeting each other at a right angle and forming a perfect square. Walter De Maria's Las Vegas Piece, long reclaimed by the desert and inaccurately described in the literature, was seen by a hand-full [sic] of people.

    Yes, let's take things in order. First, the hilarious image of Michael Heizer blazing down a dirt road in BF Nevada with a truckload of German museum directors. This is a thing that happened.

    Next, "declared the winner"? De Maria apparently positioned the experience of his piece as a game and a competition, a mathematical mystery that visitors were supposed to calculate with their bodies and draw in their heads. What is that about? And anyway, who is going to judge this competition? If a curator cracks an earth art mystery in the desert, and no one's within a mile of them to hear it, do they make a sound?

    There's a big point I'll get to, but let's jump to the end, where van der Marck calls out [in the footnotes] Carol Hall's 1983 paper "Environmental Artists: Sources & Directions" for an inaccurate description of Las Vegas Piece. Well, my diagram above would need correcting, too. According to van der Marck, the two mile-long lines in Las Vegas Piece met, and each was bisected by a half-mile trench, which met in turn to form the square. Which would look more like a right angle bracket, like this:

    demaria_las_vegas_piece_revised.jpg

    But the artist himself needs correcting, too. Because the diagram I drew was based on de Maria's explanation to Cumming. And the biggest difference of all, of course, is that de Maria told Cumming the trench was "about a foot deep, two feet deep and about eight feet wide." Yet van der Marck said it was eight feet deep and that they had to lower themselves into it. This is a non-trivial difference. If it was the former, then visitors would be in constant sight of the surrounding landscape and each other. If it's the latter, they're completely cut off. From everything. All they have is the view along the trench, and the darkening sky. It's the difference between a meditative labyrinth path, and an actual FPS-style labyrinth.

    Also, if De Maria's piece was really eight feet deep, it would relate more directly to Heizer's nearby Double Negative--and it would still almost certainly be visible, or at least findable.

    And now the fact that as august a scholar as Miwon Kwon relied on as ambiguous a guide as CLUI tells me that no one actually knows what the deal is with Las Vegas Piece. Except, perhaps Virginia Dwan.

    UPDATE: Indeed. Virginia Dwan donated her gallery's archives to the Smithsonian, but they are currently closed for processing. According to Margaret Iversen's 2007 book on post-Freudianism, Dwan told Charles Stuckey in an 1984 interview that De Maria forbade any photographs or documentation of Las Vegas Piece, partly to abjure the work's commodification.

    demaria_las_vegas_piece_aerial_bw.jpg

    Yet an unsourced, undated aerial photo reproduced on this French webpage seems to depict Las Vegas Piece. The scale is about right. And when I flipped it 180-degrees, the geographic features look like they match the area just to the right/east of the map marker above. But what are we actually seeing? Isn't that top line a road? And there's a diagonal line. Yet if they're not Las Vegas Piece, who would take this picture here, and why? If it's really credible, I'd guess that the photo was the source of CLUI's coordinates, identified by the same method I just did: by eyeballing.

    When Dwan accompanied Calvin Tomkins on a visit to Las Vegas Piece in 1976, they followed a map De Maria made, but never located the work itself. This despite Dwan's having visited the site before. Lawrence Alloway made it, though, for his October 1976 Artforum article, "Site Inspection." [Both accounts are only online as excerpts in Iriz Amizlev's 1999 dissertation, "Land Art: Layers of Memory," from the Universite de Montreal. (pdf). Amizlev also ID's Carlos Huber of Kunsthalle Basel and John Weber in the back seat of Heizer's pickup.]

  • Permalink for 'FOIA Party'

    FOIA Party

    Posted: 6-March-2014, 2:09pm EST

    bradheath_fbi_foia_01.png

    The FBI has provided these photos in response to USA Today investigative reporter Brad Heath's 2012 Freedom Of Information Act requests. They have been redacted under FOIA exemption (b)(6), to protect the personal privacy of FBI personnel. Presumably, the presence of Timon from Lion King was determined not to violate the privacy of the attendees at this retirement party.

    bradheath_fbi_foia_02.png

    bradheath_fbi_foia_03.png

    There is no way to redact the FBI's inspiration, however. Color me impressed. [@bradheath via @AlJavieera]

    John_Baldessari_dots_ptg.jpg
    John Baldessari, probably 1988 or so, image via thegroundmag.com

  • Permalink for 'Want To See: Harvey Quaytman at McKee Gallery'

    Want To See: Harvey Quaytman at McKee Gallery

    Posted: 26-February-2014, 10:02pm EST

    quaytman_kufikind_mckee.jpg

    I'm fascinated to see the Harvey Quaytman show at McKee Gallery; I've only ever seen a couple of his paintings in person, and the range here is great. The painting above, Kufikind, 1970, is one of the earliest in the show.

    quaytman_mckee_install.jpg

    There's also a group/series of square paintings from the 1980s and '90s that have on a cross format. On the screen they feel a bit like Peter Halleys, variations on a set geometry. But there are plenty of other types of work that seem to prevent any one type of painting from becoming a Halley-like Quaytman brand.

    Harvey Quaytman at McKee Gallery, Feb 19 - Mar 22, 2014 [mckeegallery.com]

  • Permalink for 'Untitled (290 x 404, After Graduation, 2008, by Richard Prince)'

    Untitled (290 x 404, After Graduation, 2008, by Richard Prince)

    Posted: 16-February-2014, 7:06pm EST

    untitled_290x404_gregorg.jpg

    Who Owns This Image?

    We got this.

    Suddenly the New Yorker headline got me thinking, and I clicked on their little jpg of Graduation, and it's 290 x 404 pixels--and its original title says it's a screenshot-- almost exactly the same dimensions as Untitled (300 x 404), and I'm like, DONE. Frankly I'm kind of embarrassed it took this long.

    No need for Chinese Paint Mill; I'm ordering test prints tonight. It'll be interesting to see what that little jpg looks like at Graduation-size. Prince's Untitled (Cowboy, 2003) set the maximum for that print, just 30x40 inches. But Graduation is six feet tall, (72 3/4 by 52 1/2 inches, 1.85 x 1.33m). Could be a real mess, but that's fair use for the rest of us.

    Who Owns This Image? [newyorker]
    Previously, related:

    May 2009
    the instigation: West Trademark F@*#(up
    the concept: 300x404, the making of

    June 2009:
    proofs: Richard Prints, Untitled (300 x 404)

    June 2010
    published: Untitled (300 x 404) @ 20 x 200

    the review/thinkpiece: the great debate: the value of greg allen's untitled (300 x 404) [artfcity]

  • Permalink for ''I Had No Intention Of Making Good Paintings''

    'I Had No Intention Of Making Good Paintings'

    Posted: 14-February-2014, 12:41pm EST

    I said it publicly a couple of times now, and I was more cynical about them then than I am now, but when I first saw Richard Prince's Canal Zone paintings, I thought he was trying to see how bad he could paint. I half-joked that he wanted to see if his new dealer Larry Gagosian could really sell whatever shit he literally slapped together.

    The higher concept way of putting that, of course, is that Prince was interested in process over product, in setting constraints and parameters on his practice, and in destabilizing himself by experimenting with techniques he knew he hadn't mastered.

    I really came to appreciate the paintings, not so much for themselves--they're still undeniably shitty--but for their catalytic effect, the way the Cariou lawsuit compelled Prince to talk at length and under oath, about his work. His deposition is really pure art historical gold, and the way art is discussed in the legal context is disorienting and exciting to me, language-wise.

    gh_banalzone.jpg

    Still, as the legal case drags on, I find the paintings themselves--more precisely, the images of the paintings themselves, since almost no one's seen the actual objects for years now--kind of tedious, beside the point. And my interest wasn't rekindled by Banal Zone, Jomar Statkun show of Chinese Paint Mill copies of Prince's paintings. Literally any idiot can order Chinese Paint Mill paintings. Ask me how I know! And anyway, those joints were Inkjets by NancyScans.

    But I am glad that Statkun's show serves as the catalyst for Prince to birdtalk about making the Canal Zone paintings. Because CALLED IT:

    But aren't I curious about the "Chinese" paintings my anonymous friends ask? No I'm not. From what I've seen they look worst than some of the paintings I've already painted. You have to understand that when I started out painting my Canal Zone paintings I had no intention of making good paintings. In fact most of them were never finished and the majority were an experiment with new painting techniques. (This is the first time I've gone on the record about this stuff). Anyway... there are a couple of Canal Zone paintings that WERE aggressive and satisfying in ways that hard to describe... they were done quickly and under the influence of certain music I was listening to at the time... and part of this "screen play" I was toying around with. They started out as storyboards for a "pitch" called Eden Rock. (You got to start somewhere). They started off innocently enough when I found this Rasta book on vacation and I simply starting to use some of the images in the book for collages. (Early on I pasted a guitar over the body of one of the Rasta's, kind of lined it up so that the Rasta looked as if he was "wailing" away... and there you go... off to the races). I can't say it more simply. Wild History.

    Expecting Good Paintings out of Richard Prince is as crazy as expecting Good Photographs. It's just not how he rolls.

    BIRDTALK 2/12/2014 [richardprince.com]
    Garis & Hahn Presents Jomar Statkun's 'Banal Zone' [hyperallergic sponsor; direct to garisandhahn]

  • Permalink for 'The VW Years: Virginia Dwan Edition'

    The VW Years: Virginia Dwan Edition

    Posted: 13-February-2014, 9:08am EST

    Oh-ho, here is an awesome entry for The VW Years, greg.org's ongoing mission to collect firsthand accounts of John Cage and Merce Cunningham's VW Bus. The idea comes from the title of a chapter in dancer Carolyn Brown's fascinating memoir, Chance and Circumstance: Twenty Years With Cage And Cunningham.

    But this account's from art dealer Virginia Dwan, in Artforum's 500 Words, as told to Lauren O'Neill-Butler:

    In New York, I became very interested in and involved with Minimalism and gave solo shows to Sol LeWitt and Carl Andre, and later Robert Smithson. When I moved the gallery to West Fifty-Seventh Street, I didn't have enough space for them to do very large works, so I kept the gallery in Los Angeles with my assistant John Weber still working there, and I sent the artists out there to put up their shows. A favorite memory was when Merce Cunningham, John Cage, David Tudor, and Robert Rauschenberg drove from New York in a Volkswagen bus for one of Robert's shows. They parked it in front of my house in Malibu and out of this bus came nine people. It was like a circus bus with endless people emerging. They had all driven from New York to Los Angeles and stopped along the way giving performances. I didn't know how they all fit, yet there they all were in the bus.

    The Robert she's referring to has to be Rauschenberg, not Smithson. And it looks like Rauschenberg showed twice at Dwan's Los Angeles gallery, in 1962, and 1965. The first show corresponds to what Brown called "the golden years" of touring, which ended in June 1964, when Rauschenberg won the Venice Bienale during the company's tour of Japan, and it became a problem, and there was a messy split, so the idea of all these now-celebrities piling back into a VW bus and dance-busking their way to Bob's show seems, at the very least, improbable.

    rauschenberg_dwan_1962_combines.jpg

    So it was 1962, before Dwan's New York gallery, and in her first LA space. Rauschenberg's show ran March 4-31. The Dwan Archives at the Smithsonian give the title, "Drawings," but there's a little installation photo in Terry Schimmel's Combines catalogue [above] that clearly shows Combines. From left: First Landing Jump (1961); Blue Eagle (1961); Black Market (1961); Navigator (1962); and Pantomime (1961). [Schimmel's appendix note that Co-existence (1961), Rigger (1961) and Wooden Gallop (1962) were also in the show.]

    Rauschenberg_Black_Market_1961.jpg
    Robert Rauschenberg, Black Market, 1961, collection Ludwig Museum, Cologne

    Black Market is an amazing and important work, and one that relates directly to another ongoing greg.org topic: Short Circuit and Jasper Johns' Flag. Black Market contains a valise on the floor with various items and diagrams from Rauschenberg which viewers would exchange for a personally valuable item of their own. There's a little Rauschenberg stamp pad, too, so everything you put in would be(come) a Rauschenberg. Think about that for a while.

    It was first viewed in 1961 at the Stedelijk, and had its US debut at Dwan. There's a lot more going on with this work, but it's already too tangential for words right now. Suffice it to say, Jasper Johns was not on the bus.

    Virginia Dwan | 500 Words, fortunately part 1 of 2 [artforum]

    Previously:
    The VW Years: Ch. 1 - 1957 - The Italian gameshow mushroom boondoggle
    Ch. 2 1956-62 - Remy Charlip & Steve Paxton
    Ch. 3 - John Cage
    Carolyn Brown, Part I
    Carolyn Brown, Part II, the real inspiration
    The VW Appears: a snapshot from the John Cage Trust
    The VW Years: Appendix: Living Theatre

  • Permalink for 'Aujourd'hui c'est la Sforzian Selfie'

    Aujourd'hui c'est la Sforzian Selfie

    Posted: 11-February-2014, 4:58pm EST

    fraser_wh_selfie_foreigncorresp.jpg

    OK, this is pretty sweet. For the Oval Office photo spray with Francois Hollande and Pres. Obama, the French press corps shot a bunch of selfies instead, with the world leaders in the background. The one above is from @ThomasWieder, Elysée correspondent for Le Monde, [via BBC Paris correspondent Christian Fraser, @ForeignCorresp]. It looks like he's being handled by his handler, too.

    @Thornburgh suggests it might be a protest against Hollande's recent granting of an exclusive interview to Time Europe correspondent Vivienne Walter. Time's editor at large Catherine Mayer had gloated about the get by tweeting out a selfie from the Elysée Palace a few days ago.

    catherine_mayer_elysee_selfie.jpg

    And as we know from White House correspondents, including the media in your shot is an act of aggression, or protest, no matter who's doing the including.

    Previously: Pete Souza, White House Photographer
    Hell Yes, Francois Hollande!
    Aujourd'hui c'est la rentree

  • Permalink for 'Thank You So Artist Much: Another Comment Spam Text, Annotated'

    Thank You So Artist Much: Another Comment Spam Text, Annotated

    Posted: 8-February-2014, 10:11am EST

    OK, I really can't do this every day, but this is the second time the text of a comment spam has caught my attention, and I have to chase down its sources. Maybe the algorithms are getting smarter:

    Aaaand we're done Thank you so artist much for joining my studio and then re-photographed these as a homage to James Van Der Zee [ and I had that camera everywhere. The screenshot below shows the progress so far. In terms of gender, pleasure and sexual politics well before the founding of the women's art movement, he said.

    I was first thinking the text sources were uncannily coherent in their arty grouping. But maybe it's just what you'd expect for a comment spam for a Florida makeup artist left on a blog post about C-Section cakes. Anyway, see the list after the jump.

  • Permalink for 'A Fluxhouse? Limited Edition Can Now Be Yours'

    A Fluxhouse? Limited Edition Can Now Be Yours

    Posted: 6-February-2014, 10:31pm EST

    Yesterday at MoMA, I took extra time this time in David Platzker's 4'33" exhibit so I could dig into the Fluxus material a bit more. George Maciunas' extraordinary chart of the entire history of art as seen through the other end of the Fluxus telescope was especially awesome. [The site for last year's Fluxus exhibit has a huge image of Maciunas' chart for close-up study.]

    maciunas_house_bklnmodelworks.jpg
    Fluxhouse? model via Brooklyn Model Works

    Trying to find a copy for myself, I headed to the Stendhal Gallery, the post-Fluxus home of the Maciunas/Fluxus legacy, as managed by Henry Stendhal. And that's where I found out you can now buy a license for a Fluxhouse?.

    The Fluxhouse? [always with the ?] was George Maciunas' concept for affordable, adaptable, lightweight, prefabricated housing to change the world The 1,900sf single-family house is raised on concrete piers, with structural flooring and cabinetry around the perimeter, a central kitchen/bath core, and with adaptable, non-loadbearing panels defining the spaces around a glassed-in courtyard garden. Originally, it was supposed to be made out of a cheap, environmentally friendly material like plastic.

    When Stendhal's George Maciunas Foundation showed a model of the Fluxhouse? last year [above, built by Brooklyn Model Works], the story was a bit more complex. From The Architects' Newspaper [via Fluxus Fndn]:

    The Prefab Building System first appeared in plans that Maciunas and a sometime colleague, the pugnacious philosopher/musician/all-purpose gadfly Henry Flynt, devised in 1965 for a housing system in the Soviet Union, hoping to improve on the heavy concrete residences that Soviet builders had favored since 1960. Maciunas designed, and may have helped draft, Flynt's pamphlet, which urged a return to the revolutionary aesthetics of the 1920s and an adoption of certain technologies that could democratize cultural power, including electric guitars, Buckminster Fuller domes, and Citroen 2CV cars. The Prefab System was part of this document. The Stendhal Gallery's public presentation nearly erases this origin (thought a press-kit essay by Julia Robinson does mention it), perhaps to jettison what today appears as off-putting ideological baggage. It's easy to accuse Flynt and Maciunas of naivete in attaching egalitarian hopes to the post Stallinist Soviet regime, but abstracting the design idea from any utopian context seems naïve in a different way.

    Henry Flynt's involvement, whatever it may have been, doesn't come up in the Fluxhouse? pitch.

    But when the Foundation still writes that "George Maciunas is best known as the 'Father of Soho' for colonizing and gentrifying this neighborhood from a post-industrial dystopia into a mecca for the arts," it's safe to say that building a Fluxhouse? still involves a certain utopian naivete.

    Which may or may not be described in the FluxCty? Assessment Report, the product of a five-year effort to finally take the Fluxhouse? beyond the concept sketch stage, and to turn it into a commercially viable prefab building system. And now, the next logical step in a universal housing solution: selling up to five licenses to build your own Fluxhouse? Limited Edition [pdf]. With a 2012 estimate of construction costs at $7.50/sf,, or $14,250, the limited edition license may end being the most expensive part.

    there are a lot of Fluxhouse-related links in the sidebar here [georgemaciunas.com]
    Previously, and definitely related: Modernism's embrace of systems, including George Nelson's strikingly similar modular house system from 1958
    Jan Kaplicky was a fan of Fritz Haller's steel framing system
    Kocher & Frey's Aluminaire House, which, obv
    From sketch to Vuitton marketing scheme: realizing Perriand's beach house
    Muji Houses

  • Permalink for 'The First Panfish Back On The Piers In Spring'

    The First Panfish Back On The Piers In Spring

    Posted: 6-February-2014, 9:56am EST

    The first line of this comment spam caught my eye as I was deleting it from another blog this morning:

    Let me be the first panfish back on the piers in the spring and fall, the feeding trout will be moving very high in the pool, I pull on the oars and they dive under. The loss of fishing rod gimbal her mom and her passion for the sport any other time of the year.
    Preserve the LandMake sure you fishing rod gimbal know the different varieties of fish
    that can be had from the general fish market in you area.

    I know people have used spam for poetry and such. My first thought is to see where this text actually originated.

    But Googling for highly specific phrases turns up nothing but itself; no source, just the copy. It makes me wonder if unique texts are part of a feedback loop, key performance indicators for spammer. Do the Google results for "Let me be the first panfish back on the piers" [first 81, now 147] tell spammers something useful about the success or persistence of a deployment? Does it help identify sites that remain open to comment spamming?

    Just as I was creating that link, I actually searched for a shorter phrase, "first panfish back on the piers in the spring," which turned up "Carolina saltwater anglers getting in a last blast of sea mullet fishing," a 2011 article from the Charlotte Examiner:

    If the water stays warm whiting will continue to hit longer, if it gets too cold they will shut off. But they will be the first panfish back on the piers in the spring.

    So the spam text generator's standard unit is shorter than a sentence, but longer than a phrase.

    Searching for another phrase, "moving very high in the pool," somehow only turns up six results, and two of them are for a different sentence altogether:

    Regardless of your exact location andd specific charter you
    select, you will be moving very high in the pool as not to spook the holding fish. Hopefully we can start oout close and not have to despair because they cannot keep their trophy.

    Bruce was having a great time, even if you did call me a ruin!

    I make fishing estes park standard dishes every week,
    but I could see it was murkier below annd the water was heavy.
    Pink salmon are easy to catch, handle, hold, and release catfish will reduce stress and fishing estes park increase survival.

    Here is one from the Grey Friars Pub in Ontario, whose second and last blog post, "How To Get Perfect Grill Marks," has accumulated over 56,000 comments in 14 months. The "high in the pool" comment spam was posted on Oct. 21, 2013. The other instance, from just a couple of weeks ago, doesn't have the typos. Do algo-generated comment spams have copyeditors?

    The full text of my comment spam first turned up a month earlier, Sept. 28, 2013, in Honig Biene's Gästebuch, which I can't usefully link to, so I took a screenshot:

    honig_panfish.jpg

    I don't know what any of this means, if anything. Greater literary minds than I are probably putting together comment spam conferences as I type. But like the first panfish back on the piers in spring, I am gorging on the textual sand fleas of the internet, and I have been lured and caught by the text bait that has been dangled in front of me.

1 2 3 4 ... 85







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